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TA16-187A: Symantec and Norton Security Products Contain Critical Vulnerabilities

US Cert latest breaches - Tue, 07/05/2016 - 14:50
Original release date: July 05, 2016
Systems Affected

All Symantec and Norton branded antivirus products

Overview

Symantec and Norton branded antivirus products contain multiple vulnerabilities. Some of these products are in widespread use throughout government and industry. Exploitation of these vulnerabilities could allow a remote attacker to take control of an affected system.

Description

The vulnerabilities are listed below:

CVE-2016-2207

  • Symantec Antivirus multiple remote memory corruption unpacking RAR [1]

CVE-2016-2208

  • Symantec antivirus products use common unpackers to extract malware binaries when scanning a system. A heap overflow vulnerability in the ASPack unpacker could allow an unauthenticated remote attacker to gain root privileges on Linux or OSX platforms. The vulnerability can be triggered remotely using a malicious file (via email or link) with no user interaction. [2]

CVE-2016-2209 

  • Symantec: PowerPoint misaligned stream-cache remote stack buffer overflow [3]

CVE-2016-2210

  • Symantec: Remote Stack Buffer Overflow in dec2lha library [4]         

CVE-2016-2211

  • Symantec: Symantec Antivirus multiple remote memory corruption unpacking MSPACK Archives [5]

CVE-2016-3644

  • Symantec: Heap overflow modifying MIME messages [6]      

CVE-2016-3645

  • Symantec: Integer Overflow in TNEF decoder [7]       

CVE-2016 -3646

  • Symantec: missing bounds checks in dec2zip ALPkOldFormatDecompressor::UnShrink [8]

 

Impact

The large number of products affected (24 products), across multiple platforms (OSX, Windows, and Linux), and the severity of these vulnerabilities (remote code execution at root or SYSTEM privilege) make this a very serious event. A remote, unauthenticated attacker may be able to run arbitrary code at root or SYSTEM privileges by taking advantage of these vulnerabilities. Some of the vulnerabilities require no user interaction and are network-aware, which could result in a wormable-event.

Solution

Symantec has provided patches or hotfixes to these vulnerabilities in their SYM16-008 [9] and SYM16-010 [10] security advisories.

US-CERT encourages users and network administrators to patch Symantec or Norton antivirus products immediately. While there has been no evidence of exploitation, the ease of attack, widespread nature of the products, and severity of the exploit may make this vulnerability a popular target.

References Revision History
  • July 5, 2016: Initial Release

This product is provided subject to this Notification and this Privacy & Use policy.


TA16-144A: WPAD Name Collision Vulnerability

US Cert latest breaches - Mon, 05/23/2016 - 11:38
Original release date: May 23, 2016 | Last revised: June 01, 2016
Systems Affected
  • Windows, OS X, Linux systems, and web browsers with WPAD enabled
  • Networks using unregistered or unreserved TLDs
Overview

Web Proxy Auto-Discovery (WPAD) Domain Name System (DNS) queries that are intended for resolution on private or enterprise DNS servers have been observed reaching public DNS servers [1]. In combination with the new generic top level domain (gTLD) program’s incorporation of previously undelegated gTLDs for public registration, leaked WPAD queries could result in domain name collisions with internal network naming schemes [2] [3]. Opportunistic domain registrants could abuse these collisions by configuring external proxies for network traffic and enabling man-in-the-middle (MitM) attacks across the Internet.

Description

WPAD is a protocol used to ensure all systems in an organization use the same web proxy configuration. Instead of individually modifying configurations on each device connected to a network, WPAD locates a proxy configuration file and applies the configuration automatically.

The use of WPAD is enabled by default on all Microsoft Windows operating systems and Internet Explorer browsers. WPAD is supported but not enabled by default on Mac OS X and Linux-based operating systems, as well as Safari, Chrome, and Firefox browsers.

With the New gTLD program, previously undelegated gTLD strings are now being delegated for public domain name registration [3]. These strings may be used by private or enterprise networks, and in certain circumstances, such as when a work computer is connected from a home or external network, WPAD DNS queries may be made in error to public DNS servers. Attackers may exploit such leaked WPAD queries by registering the leaked domain and setting up MitM proxy configuration files on the Internet.

Other services (e.g., mail and internal web sites) may also perform DNS queries and attempt to automatically connect to supposedly internal DNS names [4].

Impact

Leaked WPAD queries could result in domain name collisions with internal network naming schemes. If an attacker registers a domain to answer leaked WPAD queries and configures a valid proxy, there is potential to conduct man-in-the-middle (MitM) attacks across the Internet.

The WPAD vulnerability is significant to corporate assets such as laptops. In some cases, these assets are vulnerable even while at work, but observations indicate that most assets become vulnerable when used outside an internal network (e.g., home networks, public Wi-Fi networks).

The impact of other types of leaked DNS queries and connection attempts varies depending on the type of service and its configuration.

Solution

US-CERT encourages users and network administrators to implement the following recommendations to provide a more secure and efficient network infrastructure:

  • Consider disabling automatic proxy discovery/configuration in browsers and operating systems unless those systems will only be used on internal networks.
  • Consider using a registered and fully qualified domain name (FQDN) from global DNS as the root for enterprise and other internal namespace.
  • Consider using an internal TLD that is under your control and restricted from registration with the new gTLD program. Note that there is no assurance that the current list of “Reserved Names” from the new gTLD Applicant Guidebook (AGB) will remain reserved with subsequent rounds of new gTLDs [5].
  • Configure internal DNS servers to respond authoritatively to internal TLD queries.
  • Configure firewalls and proxies to log and block outbound requests for wpad.dat files.
  • Identify expected WPAD network traffic and monitor the public namespace or consider registering domains defensively to avoid future name collisions.
  • File a report with ICANN if your system is suffering demonstrable severe harm due to name collision by visiting https://forms.icann.org/en/help/name-collision/report-problems.
References Revision History
  • May 23, 2016: Initial Release
  • June 1, 2016: Added information on using TLDs restricted from registration with the gTLD program

This product is provided subject to this Notification and this Privacy & Use policy.


TA16-132A: Exploitation of SAP Business Applications

US Cert latest breaches - Wed, 05/11/2016 - 11:31
Original release date: May 11, 2016
Systems Affected

Outdated or misconfigured SAP systems

Overview

At least 36 organizations worldwide are affected by an SAP vulnerability [1]. Security researchers from Onapsis discovered indicators of exploitation against these organizations’ SAP business applications.

The observed indicators relate to the abuse of the Invoker Servlet, a built-in functionality in SAP NetWeaver Application Server Java systems (SAP Java platforms). The Invoker Servlet contains a vulnerability that was patched by SAP in 2010. However, the vulnerability continues to affect outdated and misconfigured SAP systems.

Description

SAP systems running outdated or misconfigured software are exposed to increased risks of malicious attacks.

The Invoker Servlet vulnerability affects business applications running on SAP Java platforms.

SAP Java platforms are the base technology stack for many SAP business applications and technical components, including:

  • SAP Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP),
  • SAP Product Lifecycle Management (PLM),
  • SAP Customer Relationship Management (CRM),
  • SAP Supply Chain Management (SCM),
  • SAP Supplier Relationship Management (SRM),
  • SAP NetWeaver Business Warehouse (BW),
  • SAP Business Intelligence (BI),
  • SAP NetWeaver Mobile Infrastructure (MI),
  • SAP Enterprise Portal (EP),
  • SAP Process Integration (PI),
  • SAP Exchange Infrastructure (XI),
  • SAP Solution Manager (SolMan),
  • SAP NetWeaver Development Infrastructure (NWDI),
  • SAP Central Process Scheduling (CPS),
  • SAP NetWeaver Composition Environment (CE),
  • SAP NetWeaver Enterprise Search,
  • SAP NetWeaver Identity Management (IdM), and
  • SAP Governance, Risk & Control 5.x (GRC).

The vulnerability resides on the SAP application layer, so it is independent of the operating system and database application that support the SAP system.

Impact

Exploitation of the Invoker Servlet vulnerability gives unauthenticated remote attackers full access to affected SAP platforms, providing complete control of the business information and processes on these systems, as well as potential access to other systems.

Solution

In order to mitigate this vulnerability, US-CERT recommends users and administrators implement SAP Security Note 1445998 and disable the Invoker Servlet. For more mitigation details, please review the Onapsis threat report [1].

In addition, US-CERT encourages that users and administrators:

  • Scan systems for all known vulnerabilities, such as missing security patches and dangerous system configurations.
  • Identify and analyze the security settings of SAP interfaces between systems and applications to understand risks posed by these trust relationships.
  • Analyze systems for malicious or excessive user authorizations.
  • Monitor systems for indicators of compromise resulting from the exploitation of vulnerabilities.
  • Monitor systems for suspicious user behavior, including both privileged and non-privileged users.
  • Apply threat intelligence on new vulnerabilities to improve the security posture against advanced targeted attacks.
  • Define comprehensive security baselines for systems and continuously monitor for compliance violations and remediate detected deviations.

These recommendations apply to SAP systems in public, private, and hybrid cloud environments.

Note: The U.S. Government does not endorse or support any particular product or vendor.

References Revision History
  • May 11, 2016: Initial Release

This product is provided subject to this Notification and this Privacy & Use policy.


TA16-105A: Apple Ends Support for QuickTime for Windows; New Vulnerabilities Announced

US Cert latest breaches - Thu, 04/14/2016 - 19:48
Original release date: April 14, 2016
Systems Affected

Microsoft Windows with Apple QuickTime installed

Overview

According to Trend Micro, Apple will no longer be providing security updates for QuickTime for Windows, leaving this software vulnerable to exploitation. [1]

Description

All software products have a lifecycle. Apple will no longer be providing security updates for QuickTime for Windows. [1]

The Zero Day Initiative has issued advisories for two vulnerabilities found in QuickTime for Windows. [2] [3]

Impact

Computer systems running unsupported software are exposed to elevated cybersecurity dangers, such as increased risks of malicious attacks or electronic data loss. Exploitation of QuickTime for Windows vulnerabilities could allow remote attackers to take control of affected systems.

Solution

Computers running QuickTime for Windows will continue to work after support ends. However, using unsupported software may increase the risks from viruses and other security threats. Potential negative consequences include loss of confidentiality, integrity, or availability of data, as well as damage to system resources or business assets. The only mitigation available is to uninstall QuickTime for Windows. Users can find instructions for uninstalling QuickTime for Windows on the Apple Uninstall QuickTime page. [4]

References Revision History
  • April 14, 2016: Initial Release

This product is provided subject to this Notification and this Privacy & Use policy.


TA16-091A: Ransomware and Recent Variants

US Cert latest breaches - Thu, 03/31/2016 - 22:00
Original release date: March 31, 2016 | Last revised: July 11, 2016
Systems Affected

Networked Systems

Overview

In early 2016, destructive ransomware variants such as Locky and Samas were observed infecting computers belonging to individuals and businesses, which included healthcare facilities and hospitals worldwide. Ransomware is a type of malicious software that infects a computer and restricts users’ access to it until a ransom is paid to unlock it.

The United States Department of Homeland Security (DHS), in collaboration with Canadian Cyber Incident Response Centre (CCIRC), is releasing this Alert to provide further information on ransomware, specifically its main characteristics, its prevalence, variants that may be proliferating, and how users can prevent and mitigate against ransomware.

Description WHAT IS RANSOMWARE?

Ransomware is a type of malware that infects computer systems, restricting users’ access to the infected systems. Ransomware variants have been observed for several years and often attempt to extort money from victims by displaying an on-screen alert. Typically, these alerts state that the user’s systems have been locked or that the user’s files have been encrypted. Users are told that unless a ransom is paid, access will not be restored. The ransom demanded from individuals varies greatly but is frequently $200–$400 dollars and must be paid in virtual currency, such as Bitcoin.

Ransomware is often spread through phishing emails that contain malicious attachments or through drive-by downloading. Drive-by downloading occurs when a user unknowingly visits an infected website and then malware is downloaded and installed without the user’s knowledge.

Crypto ransomware, a malware variant that encrypts files, is spread through similar methods and has also been spread through social media, such as Web-based instant messaging applications. Additionally, newer methods of ransomware infection have been observed. For example, vulnerable Web servers have been exploited as an entry point to gain access into an organization’s network.

WHY IS IT SO EFFECTIVE?

The authors of ransomware instill fear and panic into their victims, causing them to click on a link or pay a ransom, and users systems can become infected with additional malware. Ransomware displays intimidating messages similar to those below:

  • “Your computer has been infected with a virus. Click here to resolve the issue.”
  • “Your computer was used to visit websites with illegal content. To unlock your computer, you must pay a $100 fine.”
  • “All files on your computer have been encrypted. You must pay this ransom within 72 hours to regain access to your data.”
PROLIFERATION OF VARIANTS

In 2012, Symantec, using data from a command and control (C2) server of 5,700 computers compromised in one day, estimated that approximately 2.9 percent of those compromised users paid the ransom. With an average ransom of $200, this meant malicious actors profited $33,600 per day, or $394,400 per month, from a single C2 server. These rough estimates demonstrate how profitable ransomware can be for malicious actors.

This financial success has likely led to a proliferation of ransomware variants. In 2013, more destructive and lucrative ransomware variants were introduced, including Xorist, CryptorBit, and CryptoLocker. Some variants encrypt not just the files on the infected device, but also the contents of shared or networked drives. These variants are considered destructive because they encrypt users’ and organizations’ files, and render them useless until criminals receive a ransom.

In early 2016, a destructive ransomware variant, Locky, was observed infecting computers belonging to healthcare facilities and hospitals in the United States, New Zealand, and Germany. It propagates through spam emails that include malicious Microsoft Office documents or compressed attachments (e.g., .rar, .zip). The malicious attachments contain macros or JavaScript files to download Ransomware-Locky files.

Samas, another variant of destructive ransomware, was used to compromise the networks of healthcare facilities in 2016. Unlike Locky, Samas propagates through vulnerable Web servers. After the Web server was compromised, uploaded Ransomware-Samas files were used to infect the organization’s networks.

LINKS TO OTHER TYPES OF MALWARE

Systems infected with ransomware are also often infected with other malware. In the case of CryptoLocker, a user typically becomes infected by opening a malicious attachment from an email. This malicious attachment contains Upatre, a downloader, which infects the user with GameOver Zeus. GameOver Zeus is a variant of the Zeus Trojan that steals banking information and is also used to steal other types of data. Once a system is infected with GameOver Zeus, Upatre will also download CryptoLocker. Finally, CryptoLocker encrypts files on the infected system, and requests that a ransom be paid.

The close ties between ransomware and other types of malware were demonstrated through the recent botnet disruption operation against GameOver Zeus, which also proved effective against CryptoLocker. In June 2014, an international law enforcement operation successfully weakened the infrastructure of both GameOver Zeus and CryptoLocker.

Impact

Ransomware not only targets home users; businesses can also become infected with ransomware, leading to negative consequences, including

  • temporary or permanent loss of sensitive or proprietary information,
  • disruption to regular operations,
  • financial losses incurred to restore systems and files, and
  • potential harm to an organization’s reputation.

Paying the ransom does not guarantee the encrypted files will be released; it only guarantees that the malicious actors receive the victim’s money, and in some cases, their banking information. In addition, decrypting files does not mean the malware infection itself has been removed.

Solution

Infections can be devastating to an individual or organization, and recovery can be a difficult process that may require the services of a reputable data recovery specialist.

US-CERT recommends that users and administrators take the following preventive measures to protect their computer networks from ransomware infection:

  • Employ a data backup and recovery plan for all critical information. Perform and test regular backups to limit the impact of data or system loss and to expedite the recovery process. Note that network-connected backups can also be affected by ransomware; critical backups should be isolated from the network for optimum protection.
  • Use application whitelisting to help prevent malicious software and unapproved programs from running. Application whitelisting is one of the best security strategies as it allows only specified programs to run, while blocking all others, including malicious software.
  • Keep your operating system and software up-to-date with the latest patches. Vulnerable applications and operating systems are the target of most attacks. Ensuring these are patched with the latest updates greatly reduces the number of exploitable entry points available to an attacker.
  • Maintain up-to-date anti-virus software, and scan all software downloaded from the internet prior to executing.
  • Restrict users’ ability (permissions) to install and run unwanted software applications, and apply the principle of “Least Privilege” to all systems and services. Restricting these privileges may prevent malware from running or limit its capability to spread through the network.
  • Avoid enabling macros from email attachments. If a user opens the attachment and enables macros, embedded code will execute the malware on the machine. For enterprises or organizations, it may be best to block email messages with attachments from suspicious sources. For information on safely handling email attachments, see Recognizing and Avoiding Email Scams. Follow safe practices when browsing the Web. See Good Security Habits and Safeguarding Your Data for additional details.
  • Do not follow unsolicited Web links in emails. Refer to the US-CERT Security Tip on Avoiding Social Engineering and Phishing Attacks or the Security Publication on Ransomware for more information.

Individuals or organizations are discouraged from paying the ransom, as this does not guarantee files will be released. Report instances of fraud to the FBI at the Internet Crime Complaint Center.

References Revision History
  • March 31, 2016: Initial publication
  • May 6, 2016: Clarified guidance on offline backups
  • July 11, 2016: Added link to governmental interagency guidance on ransomware

This product is provided subject to this Notification and this Privacy & Use policy.


IBM PowerVC Version 1.2.3 Introduction and Configuration

IBM News Feed - Wed, 09/02/2015 - 13:30
Draft Redbook, last updated: Wed, 2 Sep 2015

- OpenStack compatibility for integration with cloud software stacks
- Integration of server and storage virtualization
- IBM PowerVM virtualization management

IBM® Power Virtualization Center (PowerVC) is an advanced enterprise virtualization management offering for IBM Power Systems™, based on the OpenStack framework.

IBM PowerVP: Introduction and Technical Overview

IBM News Feed - Fri, 08/14/2015 - 13:30
Redpaper, published: Fri, 14 Aug 2015

This IBM® Redpaper™ publication is a comprehensive guide that covers IBM Power Virtualization Performance (PowerVP™) for IBM Power Systems™ Version 1.1.3.

IBM PowerVP: Introduction and Technical Overview

IBM News Feed - Fri, 07/24/2015 - 13:30
Draft Redpaper, last updated: Fri, 24 Jul 2015

This IBM® Redpaper™ publication is a comprehensive guide that covers IBM Power Virtualization Performance (PowerVP™) for IBM Power Systems™ Version 1.1.3.

IBM Power System E850 Technical Overview and Introduction

IBM News Feed - Wed, 06/17/2015 - 13:30
Redpaper, published: Wed, 17 Jun 2015

This IBM® Redpaper™ publication is a comprehensive guide covering the IBM Power System E850 (8408-E8E) server that supports IBM AIX®, and Linux operating systems.

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